up, up, up, and away
and over to the gratitude cafe
nycedc:

To coincide with this week’s #UNClimateSummit, artists installed a 3,000 pound ice sculpture spelling out “The Future” at #Flatiron North Plaza. Over the course of 12 hours, the sculpture melted away, literally and metaphorically, representing a need for immediate action to confront #globalwarming. #publicart #PeoplesClimate #Sept21 #ligoranoreese #ClimateWeek (at Flatiron Plaza)

nycedc:

To coincide with this week’s #UNClimateSummit, artists installed a 3,000 pound ice sculpture spelling out “The Future” at #Flatiron North Plaza. Over the course of 12 hours, the sculpture melted away, literally and metaphorically, representing a need for immediate action to confront #globalwarming. #publicart #PeoplesClimate #Sept21 #ligoranoreese #ClimateWeek (at Flatiron Plaza)

newyorker:

Carolyn Kormann reflects on the diverse crowd at the People’s Climate March:

"The climate-change movement is still mostly made up of white people and still falls short of adequately representing the multinational effects of climate change, but on Sunday, organizers were going for a broader coalition—and they got it."

Photograph by Jonno Rattman

newyorker:

Carolyn Kormann reflects on the diverse crowd at the People’s Climate March:

"The climate-change movement is still mostly made up of white people and still falls short of adequately representing the multinational effects of climate change, but on Sunday, organizers were going for a broader coalition—and they got it."

Photograph by Jonno Rattman

explore-blog:

The fine folks of Holstee have turned my 7 life-learnings from 7 years of Brain Pickings into a gorgeous letterpress poster inspired by mid-century children’s book illustration. Get it here. Read the original article here. 

explore-blog:

The fine folks of Holstee have turned my 7 life-learnings from 7 years of Brain Pickings into a gorgeous letterpress poster inspired by mid-century children’s book illustration. Get it here. Read the original article here

explore-blog:

Sam Harris on how to live with presence and cultivate happiness through nonreligious spirituality
thisiscitylab:


The idea works like this: All of Original Unverpackt’s dry goods—rice, cereal, spices—are stored in large dispenser bins, and customers fill containers they have either brought with them or purchased in the store. Liquid goods such as juice or yogurt are sold in jars or bottles with a deposit on them (already an all-but-mandatory system in Germany anyway). There is no minimum limit on how much customers buy, and to ensure that they get a fair deal, the containers that customers bring are weighed and marked accordingly when they enter the shop.  Around 80 percent of the store’s products are organic, and while the origin of each product is listed next to the price per kilo, no brand-name products are sold.

-The Supermarket of the Future Has No Packaging
[Photo: Jendrik Schröder]

thisiscitylab:

The idea works like this: All of Original Unverpackt’s dry goods—rice, cereal, spices—are stored in large dispenser bins, and customers fill containers they have either brought with them or purchased in the store. Liquid goods such as juice or yogurt are sold in jars or bottles with a deposit on them (already an all-but-mandatory system in Germany anyway). There is no minimum limit on how much customers buy, and to ensure that they get a fair deal, the containers that customers bring are weighed and marked accordingly when they enter the shop.  Around 80 percent of the store’s products are organic, and while the origin of each product is listed next to the price per kilo, no brand-name products are sold.

-The Supermarket of the Future Has No Packaging

[Photo: Jendrik Schröder]

theenergyissue:

Intolerable Beauty: Portraits of American Mass Consumption

For his series Intolerable Beauty, photographer Chris Jordan peered into shipping ports and industrial yards around America. Though these sites remain unseen by the majority of the population, they hold the stunningly massive remains of our collective consumption. Jordan’s findings include seemingly boundless troves of cell phones, e-waste, circuit boards, cell phone chargers, cars, spent bullet casings, cigarette butts, and steel shred. Jordan describes the immense scale of our detritus as simultaneously “desolate, macabre, oddly comical and ironic, and even darkly beautiful.” Like Edward Burtynsky’s photographs of our vast industrial landscapes, Jordan’s images portray a staggering complexity that verges on the sublime. The photographs reflect the loss of individual identity that results from actions that occur on such a large scale, but Jordan hopes his work can “serve as portals to a kind of cultural self-inquiry” and inspire people to reestablish a personal stake in issues of energy consumption.

(via sociology-of-space)

instagram:

Igniting Handheld Fireworks at Summer Festivals in Japan

For more photos and videos of the handheld fireworks, browse the 手筒花火 hashtag.

Brave men of central Japan ignite handheld fireworks, bringing exciting showers of flames to local summer fire festivals. These cylindrical, handheld pyrotechnics called “tezutsu-hanabi” (手筒花火) originated in Toyohashi during the Edo Period (1603-1868) and continues in modern-day Japan with events such as the 19th annual Fire Festival (炎の祭典) this Saturday. To make these fireworks, craftsmen stuff black powder into bamboo trunks casted with thick ropes. Once lit, the cylinders spray sparks of fire until the explosives finish with a loud blast.

Shinto festivals traditionally used fireworks to protect people from evil spirits and bad fortune, and they now make up an essential summertime activity in Japan. The handheld fireworks are still crafted to present as offerings to local shrines until they are fired on festival day. Only a handful of summer events in central Japan feature this type of fireworks, and the thrilling displays of men inside downpours of sparks offer local and visiting Instagrammers a chance to capture some of the most spectacular moments of the summer.

(via npr)

betterblockkc:

So What Exactly Is A Road Diet?
A closer look at what has been called “one of the greatest transportation safety field’s greatest success stories.”
Read More>

betterblockkc:

So What Exactly Is A Road Diet?

A closer look at what has been called “one of the greatest transportation safety field’s greatest success stories.”

Read More>

(via thisbigcity)